Iron gall ink recipe

I stumbled upon iron gall ink (the focus of many academic studies, as it has caused deterioration of important ancient manuscripts). Gall ink is made by creating a tannic liquid from fermented, oak tree galls and adding ferrous sulfate and gum arabic. The excess of iron sulfate in many folk recipes for this ink makes them unstable. First Step: the gall oak, reduce the gall oak in powder (50g) or weigh the ready to use powder; Second Step: put the gall oak powder in a part of the cold water (700ml) Third Step: Cook over low heat (1 hour to 2 hours) – Do not evaporate too much water (Max 2/4). Stir with the spatula sometimes and before pour. Pomegranate Ink: Historically, iron gall ink was traditionally made from oak galls, pomegranates, or other tannic acid-containing plant sources. You, too, can make a permanent, waterproof iron gall ink from pomegranates, just like the ancients. "Rohrer & Klingner *since 1892* Fountain Pen Ink - Old Golden Green - 50ml" is an unusual yellow-green ink with no known close alternatives in any other range. There are many other green inks but most are far bolder; this is muted and consequently more attractive and usable. It is an oak gall ink recipe by Giovambattista Palatino (1515-1575, Italy) from Scribes and Sources by A.S. Osley, pg. 92-93. The batch was started on Sunday. I cracked 1 1/2 ounces of oak galls and added them to 16 ounces of distilled water (substitute for rain water). Recipe calls for allowing them to "soak in the sun for a day or two." Traditional recipes call for fermenting the oak gall and iron shavings. I have all the ingredients but have never made it myself, except at the workshop.” (more in Project Day) So we need to get some moss-be-gone. We have the vinegar and gum arabic. …and then someone suggested this site…. Many old manuscripts suffer from iron-gall ink corrosion, threatening our graphic heritage. Corroded papers become brown and brittle with age. The chemical reactions involved in this corrosion are relatively well known: they include both acidic hydrolysis and oxidation catalysed by free iron(II). Yet, a great variety of iron-gall ink recipes, including a wide range of constituents can be found ... They did this through their own “hands-on” work: scrutinizing letters, notebooks, and diaries written by women and men hundreds of years ago, experimenting with historical writing materials (bird-feather quills, iron gall ink, and rag paper), and – best of all, from my perspective – bringing an old recipe to life. When the ink on the Dead Sea Scrolls was analyzed using a cyclotron at the Davis campus of the University of California, there were three recipes for the ink. One was the carbon base gall ink; the other was the iron gall ink. The difference in the two is Iron-gall ink burned into the parchment by reacting with collagen in the skin. Sep 12, 2019 · Iron gall ink is a purple-black or brown-black ink made from iron salts and tannic acids from vegetable sources. It was the standard ink formulation used in Europe for the fourteen-hundred year period between the 5th and 19th centuries, remained in widespread use well into the 20th century, and is still sold today. Mar 05, 2016 · A Quick Oak Gall Ink update We are coming up on the end of the two week period of the oak galls soaking in their mixture. Unfortunately, on day 14, I will be gone all day performing on the Firefhouse Follies Radio Show which I'm going to link here because you KNOW you want to give it… historic recipe for iron gall ink. Author / Source: Polytechnische Centralhalle. No. 1, Leipzig 04. Januar 1855, S. 31 Processing Black ink was often made from gallnuts and called iron-gall ink. Although different scribes would have different ways of creating this ink, they most often included gallnuts, iron vitriol, and gum arabic. These items would be mixed with either water or wine (or other liquids, such as beer or vinegar) to create a more liquid ink. Different historical writing inks such as Pfalz ink from red wine, iron-gall ink, copper-gall ink, logwood tree ink, and others were selected as standard ink sam-ples [34]. The choice of these inks was based upon their maximum prevalence and availability. Namely, these ancient ink recipes fall into the most popular cat- As Jo Wheeler has noted, the majority of surviving Renaissance ink recipes are related to the making of iron gall ink, which was used since the twelfth century and involved a combination of iron salts with gall from animal or plant sources. 2 A common source in which to locate such recipes are Renaissance books of secrets. 3 The De Secreti of ... May 16, 2018 · At its most basic recipe – the earliest of which is found in Pliny – iron gall ink is comprised of four components: gall nuts, iron sulfate, water and gum arabic. Gall nuts form on oak trees as a defense against the irritant of hatching insects and are the source for the ink’s tannins – biomolecules used for tanning leather and dyeing textiles. Recipe. This iron gall ink recipe is taken from the Household Cyclopedia of General Information, published in 1881. It is not in common use now, though the preparation of inks with similar methods was common at one time. Recipe for 1 gallon of ink: Twelve oz. nut-galls; 8 oz. each, sulfate of indigo and copperas; A few cloves; 4 or 6 oz. of gum ... (1) Ink (1): Iron Gall. 2 g of gum arabic was dissolved in water and set aside. Two galls were crushed and covered with 75 ml of water in a beaker where a brown colored solution is obtained after overnight incubation at room temperature. 2 g of iron sulfate was dissolved in 45 ml of water and mixed with filtered gall and gum arabic solutions [ 27 ]. Making iron-gall ink is attractive in its relative simplicity and mutability—you can use acorns and steel wool in a pinch. In contrast, our printing ink recipe had the improved distinctions of looking and sounding impressively antiquated and requiring some heat. On the ink-making day, students assembled the ingredients following the recipe. The most surprising and exciting part was adding the ferrous sulfate, which turned the formerly beer-brown liquid into the blackest black. We then strained the liquid and poured them into old spice bottles. The recipe made enough for each student to have a bottle. Alizarine ink was created in 1855 by Professor Leonhardi of Dresden, Germany, by adding alizarin dye (derived from the root of the madder plant) to conventional iron gall ink. This added an attractive coloration to the ink, which was quite popular until it was replaced by more modern chemical inks. Crafting with Jessica: Iron Gall Ink In Brother Hugo and the Bear, medievalist Katy Beebe walks young readers through the painstaking process of book making in the Middle Ages. Last month, we showed you how to create your own hand-sew… It is an Iron Gall Ink. Leave it be.IanRol 03:55, 28 July 2013 (UTC) The Ink recipes are not fully specified. The ink recipes as given, specify several liquid acids purely by volume. For a usable recipe, the concentration of the acid needs also to be specified, either as a percentage by weight or a molarity value. The Romans used an ink made of soot mixed with water. The Egyptians made ink by mixing water, plant fluids and lampblack. These inks were simple to produce and use, but they faded over time. In medieval times, scribes started to use iron gall ink, which soaked into the parchment and so did not fade in the same way. Making iron-gall ink is attractive in its relative simplicity and mutability—you can use acorns and steel wool in a pinch. In contrast, our printing ink recipe had the improved distinctions of looking and sounding impressively antiquated and requiring some heat. Iron gall ink is a purple-black or brown-black ink made from iron salts and tannic acids from vegetable sources. It was the standard ink formulation used in Europe for the fourteen-hundred year period between the 5th and 19th centuries, remained in widespread use well into the 20th century, and is still sold today. Dec 19, 2013 · The galls contain high proportions of tannin and, mixed with iron salts, were historically the source of a purple-black or brown ink. The comprehensive and scholarly Iron Gall Ink Website has an ink history here. The fourth century Codex Sinaiticus, one of the most complete versions of the Bible, was written in iron gall ink, in Greek. In the first, take the galls and the logwood and put them into a 4 quart stainless steel pan and add four cups of water, distilled if possible. Chlorine, flouride, salts and minerals in tap water do funny things to ink over time. First Boiling: Over a medium fire, boil the galls and logwood for one hour. Alizarine ink was created in 1855 by Professor Leonhardi of Dresden, Germany, by adding alizarin dye (derived from the root of the madder plant) to conventional iron gall ink. This added an attractive coloration to the ink, which was quite popular until it was replaced by more modern chemical inks. Different historical writing inks such as Pfalz ink from red wine, iron-gall ink, copper-gall ink, logwood tree ink, and others were selected as standard ink sam-ples [34]. The choice of these inks was based upon their maximum prevalence and availability. Namely, these ancient ink recipes fall into the most popular cat- Mar 25, 2011 · The book is made from twelve different types of paper, six different printing inks, and at least three different home-mixed iron gall ink recipes. His bookbinder, Frederick Mayo, bound the 43 ... Apr 04, 2020 · This shows you how to make iron gall ink. The recipe is based on a 1770 recipe. 2 cups (473 ml) distilled water 2 oz. (57g) crushed oak galls 1 oz. (28g) Iron II sulfate 1/2 oz. (15g) Arabic gum. In July of 1776, Timothy Matlack, a clerk in the Pennsylvania State House, was the scribe charged with writing out the Declaration of Independence. This is t... Making iron-gall ink is attractive in its relative simplicity and mutability—you can use acorns and steel wool in a pinch. In contrast, our printing ink recipe had the improved distinctions of looking and sounding impressively antiquated and requiring some heat. Dec 01, 2000 · SUMMARIES By means of design of experiments (DOE) the role of varying concentrations of the main components in iron-gall ink were investigated. The main components in the inks used were iron(II)sulphate, tannic acid and gum Arabic. In total 12 different ink compositions were made and plotted as a line on bleached softwood sulphite paper. By applying accelerated ageing and measuring the tensile ... What are the ingredients of Oak Gall ink? There are a lot of recipes for Oak Gall ink out there and lots of different things you can use to make oak gall ink. There are however, four basic ingredients: 1 - Oak Galls (which have tannic acid), 2 - Copperas which is chemically known as Ferrous(II) Sulfate The site offers detailed information on iron gall ink, ink corrosion, current research, and conservation techniques. Furthermore, you will find many images of corroded drawings and manuscripts, an extensive literature list, ink recipes and a complete transcription of the 16th-century 'A Booke of Secrets'. Jun 05, 2019 · How to Make Iron Gall Ink. First you need a recipe, conveniently we sell a kit that includes the following recipe. 40 g of powdered Aleppo oak galls. 25 g of iron (II) sulfate (with three drops of clove oil added to it) 25 g of gum Arabic. A pair of gloves. 2 storage bottles. Coffee Filter/filter cloth. Plastic Spoon(s) On the ink-making day, students assembled the ingredients following the recipe. The most surprising and exciting part was adding the ferrous sulfate, which turned the formerly beer-brown liquid into the blackest black. We then strained the liquid and poured them into old spice bottles. The recipe made enough for each student to have a bottle. "Iron gall ink is essentially created by the chemical reaction between tannic acid and iron(II) sulfate in an aqueous solution." I think that is the same as the recipe I gave. woodlawndon Registered User On the ink-making day, students assembled the ingredients following the recipe. The most surprising and exciting part was adding the ferrous sulfate, which turned the formerly beer-brown liquid into the blackest black. We then strained the liquid and poured them into old spice bottles. The recipe made enough for each student to have a bottle.